November 14, 2019

The Same, But Different

I’ve been to India once before, when Mariquita and I came here on holiday in 2006. We did a lot of the main tourist things – the Taj Mahal, Rajasthan, a tiger safari, Goa. And we spent a little bit of time with our expat friends Anuja and Bobby in Bangalore. At Return Path, we never had any business in India, though, so this week’s trip to see LRN’s Mumbai office was my first ever work trip to India. It has been a great week getting to meet my new colleagues in our largest office on the other side of the world – about 60 meetings with nearly 200 people by the end of tomorrow. And that’s the lead-in to the theme of my visit: The Same, But Different. I mean that in a few ways. First, our own office and operation is The Same, But Different. LRN and Return Path have very different products, but there is so much in common among SaaS businesses that everything felt very, very familiar. Learning our products and processes feels a lot like learning a new language, but a close-in one – like crossing over from French to Italian or Spanish. I am […]


October 31, 2019

Book Short – You’re in Charge – Now What?

Thanks to my friend and long-time former Board member Jeff Epstein, I recently downed a new book, You’re in Charge – Now What?, by Thomas Neff and James Citrin.  I’m glad I read it.  But it was one of those business books that probably should have just been a Harvard Business Review article.  It’s best skimmed, with helpful short summaries at the end of every chapter that you could blow through quickly instead of hanging on every word.  The authors’ 8-step plan is laid out as: Prepare yourself during the countdown Align expectations Shape your management team Craft your strategic […]


October 24, 2019

Renewal

I posted years ago about the value of refreshing yourself every once in a while, comparable to the value of buying new running shoes even if you don’t think you need them Now that I’m three weeks into my new role as CEO of LRN, I’ve had a bit of an epiphany.  It’s still true that down time between jobs helped me “sharpen the saw,” to quote Stephen Covey.  It’s also still true that spending time on outside interests like coaching baseball, playing guitar, and even a new activity of taking sculpture lessons all also help me sharpen the saw.  […]


October 11, 2019

Necessity is the Mother of Leadership Innovation

About 8 years ago, I wrote a blog post that talked about the story from my MovieFone days when I went from managing 1 person to 20 overnight and had to completely rejigger my Operating System to the new environment. It was a case of required revolution over evolution for me. Trial by fire. I feel like I am living in an analogous world now. After 7 days on the job as CEO of LRN (announcement) (first days post) I am realizing that going from leading a company that I founded and led for two decades to leading a 25-year […]


September 26, 2019

Second Lap Around the Track

Second Lap Around the Track As people who have read my blog for some or all of the last 15 years know, the theme of the blog, which is called OnlyOnce, is that “You’re only a first time CEO once” inspired by my friend, long-time board member and mentor Fred Wilson.  I always give the advice to people in business or in life that “the second lap around the track is a lot easier,” whether it’s referring to the second year of a new job, the second new job out of college, or even a second marriage.  And now I’m […]


July 12, 2018

How to Get Laid Off

How to Get Laid Off – an Employee’s Perspective One of my colleagues at Return Path  saw my post about How to Quit Your Job about 5 years ago and was inspired to share this story with me.  Don’t read anything into this post, team!  There is no other meaning behind my posting it at this time, or any time, other than thinking it’s a very good way of approaching a very difficult situation, especially coming from an employee. In 2009 I was working at a software security start up in the Silicon Valley.  Times were exceedingly tough, there were several […]


September 21, 2017

Book Shorts: Summer Reading

I read a ton of books.  I usually blog about business books, at least the good ones.  I almost never blog about fiction or non-business/non-fiction books, but I had a good “what did you read this summer” conversation the other night with my CEO Forum, so I thought I’d post super quick snippets about my summer reading list, none of which was business-related. If you have kids, don’t read Sheryl Sandberg and Adam Grant’s Option B:  Facing Adversity, Building Resilience, and Finding Joy unless you’re prepared to cry or at least be choked up.  A lot.  It is a tough story to […]


August 10, 2017

The Value and Limitations of Pattern Recognition

My father-in-law, who is a doctor by training but now a health care executive, was recently talking about an unusual medical condition that someone in the family was fighting.  He had a wonderful expression he said docs use from time to time: When you hear hoof beats, it’s probably horses. But you never know when it might be a zebra. With experience (and presumably some mental wiring) comes the ability to recognize patterns.  It’s one of those things that doesn’t happen, no matter how smart you are, without the passage of time and seeing different scenarios play out in the […]


July 27, 2017

Normal People, Doing Wonderful Things

  All three of our kids were at sleep-away camp for the past month, which was a first for us.  A great, but weird, first!  Our time “off” was bracketed by the absolutely amazing story of Come From Away.  One of the first nights after the kids left, we saw the show on Broadway (Broadway show web site here, Wikipedia entry about the musical and story synopsis here).  Then the last night before they came home, we saw Tom Brokaw’s ~45 minute documentary, entitled Operation Yellow Ribbon, which you can get to here or below. Come From Away is an amazing […]


July 13, 2017

The Gift of Feedback, Part V

I’ve posted a lot over the years about feedback in all forms, but in particular how much I benefit from my 360 reviews and any form of “upward” feedback.  I’ve also posted about running a 360 process for/with your Board, modeled on Bill Campbell’s formula from Intuit. I have a lot of institutional investors in our cap table at Return Path.  I was struck this week by two emails that landed in my inbox literally adjacent to each other.  One was from one of our institutional investors, sharing guidelines and timetables for doing CEO reviews across its portfolio.  The other […]


June 15, 2017

Don’t Confuse Sucking Down with Servant Leadership

I love the concept of Servant Leadership.  From the source, the definition is: While servant leadership is a timeless concept, the phrase “servant leadership” was coined by Robert K. Greenleaf in The Servant as Leader, an essay that he first published in 1970. In that essay, Greenleaf said: “The servant-leader is servant first… It begins with the natural feeling that one wants to serve, to serve first. Then conscious choice brings one to aspire to lead. That person is sharply different from one who is leader first, perhaps because of the need to assuage an unusual power drive or to […]