Nov 092004

Gmail – I Don’t Get It, Part II

Gmail – I Don’t Get It, Part II

Back in June, I blogged about Google’s new Gmail service, how I didn’t understand the fuss, and how its features would ultimately be replicated and true usership stalled at a couple million.  I stand by those assertions (just look at what Yahoo, Hotmail, and Lookout have done to the landscape since then), but my company Return Path published some data today that’s interesting on this topic.

We run the largest Email Forwarding and Email Change of Address service around, so our data on email switching is pretty solid — we’ve had about 16 million consumers register a change of email with us in total, and about 25,000 new ones come in every single day to report a new ISP.  So our numbers are probably pretty good relative to each other (ISP to ISP or month to month at the same ISP), but they’re certainly not meant to be correct on an absolute basis.

– In July, we saw 375 people join Gmail, in August, 802, and in September, 2,396.  To put these numbers in context, we see 50,000-100,000 new users every month at Hotmail  and Yahoo, and even 5,000-15,000 new users every month at smaller ISPs like AOL, Earthlink, Comcast, and Roadrunner.  These numbers are obviously on the rise, but they’re still pretty small.  In all fairness, though, G-mail is still invitation-only, at least in theory.

– Gmail is mainly stealing share from Hotmail and Yahoo, twice as rapidly from Hotmail as from Yahoo — and twice as rapidly from Yahoo as from AOL.

Read the full article in eMarketer here.

After I saw the article this morning, I asked my colleagues Jack Sinclair and Jennifer Wilson to tell me how many people we saw leaving Gmail every month, an interesting metric to offset the one most people are interested in covering.  The answer at this point is also revealing.  While we recorded 2,396 new Gmail users in September, we also recorded 741 people leaving Gmail in the same month.   That’s a sign to me that a lot of people are trying it out to see what the buzz is all about, but many are quickly switching back after a little experimentation.

And yes, we also took a look at how many people are leaving Yahoo, Hotmail, and AOL every month relative to the number of people joining those services.  Hotmail and Yahoo do a lot of treading water (lots of people leaving, lots of people joining), but let’s just say I wouldn’t want to be the guy in charge of AOL subscriptions these days.

  • Edward Taussig

    As long as you’re using an email service that allows you to retrieve your mail via
    Outlook or Outlook Express, then simply using Google’s own new “Google Desktop” product to index your email gives you a lot of the benefit of using Gmail vs. the other services, but without having to keep all of your email stored and indexed on Google’s servers forever (And there’s no 1 gigabyte limit :-) ).
    Although it does mean that you can only search locally and not from any browser.

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